Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine

Continuing Education

PAST CONTINUING EDUCATION COURSES

infertility, IVF Support and Menopause for Acupuncturists, May 6, 2012

Gynecological problems are a common presentation in TCM & Oriental Medicine practice. With good reason, since we treat more women patients and TCM, particularly acupuncture, can be a very successful treatment for many gynecology issues. Often TCM gynecology focuses on Chinese herbs – this seminar focuses on acupuncture & moxibustion treatments, and what works in clinic, and includes case studies.

Infertility
Worldwide women suffer increasingly from infertility. We discuss the reproductive milieu and approach treatment strategies from East Asian Medicine perspectives. The focus is on clinical practice, practical application and sharing clinical experience of infertility treatments.

IVF Support
More & more women turn to IVF. Several studies (amongst others an Australian one) have shown that acupuncture is a helpful `complementary' therapy to support the IVF process and improve the success rate. `Doctor Google' steers these women to acupuncture. We discuss various approaches and protocols and practical issues.

Menopause
At the other end of the reproductive spectrum is menopause, which affects each woman more or less. More women suffer from menopausal symptoms and seek help. More of them may turn to us, now that HRT isn't so popular any more... Menopausal problems aren't always easy to treat and often require a more comprehensive treatment approach.
We look at practical treatment strategies of acupuncture and moxibustion, cases and practical demos.

This is a seminar that aims at:
  • Being helpful, clinically oriented and hopefully inspiring.
  • Giving a deeper insight into the treatment of infertility and menopause through differentiated and comprehensive treatment approaches and techniques; including pulse and abdominal diagnosis for the discussed syndromes.
  • Giving tools for applying treatment approaches and strategies of acupuncture & moxa immediately in your practice, whether you practice Chinese or Japanese styles and techniques.

About your Presenter
Trudy R Zipf M.TCM (UWS) has practiced Oriental Medicine for about 20 years in Sydney, Australia. She treats a wide spectrum of patients with acupuncture and Chinese herbs, but specializes in Women's Health.  After her TCM training in Sydney and China (Zhejiang TCM Hospital, Hangzhou), Trudy was soon introduced to Japanese Meridian Therapy and then spent several clinical training periods in Japan with Edward Obaidey and Ikeda Masakazu. Ikeda Sensei is an acupuncturist & Kampo herbalist and an influential teacher of Meridian Therapy in Japan.* Trudy also studied further over 10 years through seminar intensives with Ikeda Sensei in Australia (and is still learning from it all…).  Trudy gained a Master of Traditional Chinese Medicine (University of Western Sydney). She is a guest lecturer in the Master's program in `Women's Health' and `Advanced Acupuncture'. She occasionally writes journal articles and teaches TCM colleagues in Australia & New Zealand on clinical practice oriented topics. Trudy is particularly interested in clinical relevance & application and the further development of our `healing art'.

Modern Clinical Application of Classical Formulas, July 17 -18, 2010

Noted author, teacher, and physician, Huang Huang will be teaching a weekend seminar on classical formulas and their application. In this two-day seminar, Dr. Huang will discuss his model of "formula: disease: patient-type" and its application to common clinical presentations. Dr. Huang will focus on more than 20 of the most commonly-used formulas from the Shang Han Lun and the Jin Gui Yao Lue. During the course of the weekend, Dr. Huang will endeavor to convey his own clinical experience and to help participants understand the strategies for effective clinical practice using these classic prescriptions.

Due to large demand for this course, we have moved the event  to a larger venue and now have more seats available.

The course will take place at SIOM on July 17-18 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the University of Washington Medical Center South Campus.

Channel Palpation, October 24 - 25, 2009

Channel palpation is a classical diagnostic technique not often taught in modern acupuncture schools in the west. Emphasized in the earliest acupuncture texts (Nei Jing/Nan Jing), palpation of the channels is extremely helpful for confirming diagnosis and refining point selection.

The two-day class will focus on learning the basics of channel palpation through interactive lectures, case studies and hands-on practice of technique. Subjects covered will include:
  • An introduction to the role of the distal channels in classical physiology and a discussion of how physiology manifests with specific, palpable changes on the acupuncture channels

  • An introduction to techniques for palpating each of the twelve major channels. This section of the class will involve hands-on work by the students; palpating channels on each other with feedback from the instructor.

  • A discussion of how to utilize information gleaned from channel palpation to refine and simplify diagnosis. This will involve reconsidering traditional zang-fu (organ) diagnosis in light of new information gleaned from palpating the channels.

  • An introduction to the acupuncture treatment style of Dr. Wang Ju-yi. This class will specifically introduce a few commonly-used point pairs and clinical application of those pairs. Case studies will be described and acupuncture technique will be demonstrated.

Jason D. Robertson is the co-author of the recently released Applied Channel Theory in Chinese Medicine (Eastland Press, 2008) with his teacher Professor Wang Ju-yi. Mr. Robertson has studied Chinese language for 20 years and has studied Chinese medicine in Taiwan, Chengdu and Beijing. He currently maintains a private practice in Seattle, WA and is a full-time faculty member at the Seattle Institute of Oriental Medicine. His lectures draw from both a strong rooting in classical concepts and an emphasis on modern clinical application. Students leave Mr. Robertson’s classes with techniques that can be immediately applied in their clinics to improve clinical results.

The pillars of warm disease, July 25- 26, 2009

Instructor: Chip Chace

The two fundamental models of warm disease (wen bing) theory are the four stage (wei, qi, ying, xue) model developed by Ye Tianshi, and the triple burner theory developed by by Xue Shengbai. A comprehensive understanding of these two complimentary theories is essential to the effective application of  wenbing principles.

In this two-day training we will use the writings of Ye and Xue as the basis for our discussion of the clinical application of warm disease theory. Using both modern and premodern case records, we will see how a clear understanding of these principles allows them to be applied to a wide range of problems with a high degree of clinical efficacy. |Both the four stage and triple burner models will be approached not as fixed layers that patients must be made to fit, but as a continuums that allow for flexibity and precision in prescribing.

Chip Chace has been a student of Chinese medicine and its literature for over twenty years. He is the author and translator of a wide variety of books and articles on Chinese medicine including, A Qin Bowei Anthology, translations of the writings of one of the architects of modern Chinese medicine, and The Yellow Emperor’s Systematic Classic of Acupuncture and Moxibustion (Huang Di Zhen Jiu Jia Yi Jing ) a translation of the first textbook of acupuncture from 100 C.E. He has also written and lectured extensively on Warm Disease. Chip is a member of the faculty at the Seattle Institute or Oriental Medicine, and he maintains a busy clinical practice in Boulder Colorado.

Acupuncture & Delivery, March 7 & 8, 2009

Instructor: Claudia Citkovitz

In this course, students will learn to recognize the familiar faces of yin and yang throughout the course of childbirth, as it is measured in the hospital (contraction monitor readings, cervical dilation, effacement, descent, etc) and as it manifests in the unique physical and emotional journey of home birth. Using a broad-spectrum, clinical problem-solving approach, students will learn basic treatments to help facilitate normal labor, as well as pattern differentiation and treatments for labor that is excessively painful or failing to progress. The physiology and common pathologies of labor will be presented in detail, as will the Western interventions typically used to address them, so that students can function collaboratively in hospitals or birthing centers as well as home births. Specific needling and tui na hand techniques will also be introduced, as well as palpation for location of the fetus. The diagnostic skills taught in this course in no way substitute for midwifery training, but acupuncturists taking the class can expect to enter a birth situation confident in their ability to contribute positively to the physical and emotional well-being of the mother as well as potentially shortening duration and restarting stalled or sluggish labors.

Tui-Na - Level III, March 15 - 17, 2009

Instructor: Frank Bisio

Tui Na, literally "pushing-grasping," is the name commonly used to refer to Chinese medical massage. It differentiates medical massage from other Asian massage methods such as "An Mo" or "Shiatsu." Properly employed, the theories and techniques of Tui Na are extremely effective at treating a wide variety of problems, including structural misalignment, orthopedic problems and sports injuries, as well as internal diseases. Tui Na techniques are not meant to be applied in a vacuum, but integrated with other modalities of Chinese Medicine, including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and qi gong rehabilitative exercises.

Tui Na Level III will provide advanced training for students, with a focus on Conditions of the Lower Limb.

Tui-Na Level II, February 6 - 8, 2009

Instructor: Frank Bisio

Tui Na, literally "pushing-grasping," is the name commonly used to refer to Chinese medical massage. It differentiates medical massage from other Asian massage methods such as "An Mo" or "Shiatsu." Properly employed, the theories and techniques of Tui Na are extremely effective at treating a wide variety of problems, including structural misalignment, orthopedic problems and sports injuries, as well as internal diseases. Tui Na techniques are not meant to be applied in a vacuum, but integrated with other modalities of Chinese Medicine, including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and qi gong rehabilitative exercises.

Tui Na Level II will focus on techniques for treating conditions of the upper limb.

Shanghan Zabing Lun Pulse Methods, May 31 - June 1, 2008

Instructor: Arnaud Versluys

This course will present practical guidelines for pulse analysis based on the classical text, Shang Han Lun. In this course, Arnaud Vesluys will lecture on Zhang Zhongjing and pulse diagnosis, give a brief history of pulse diagnosis, and cover the chapters in Shang Han Lun on methods of pulse assessment and differentation. There will be a theoretical and a practical section.

Introduction to Clinical Applications of Shanghan lun Formulas, September 6, 2008

Instructor: Daniel Bensky

The Discussion of Cold Damage (Shang han lun) is the foundation of all East Asian herbal medicine and has a tremendous impact on all facets of traditional medicine. This will be a brief discussion of this modern import of this seminal work including diagnosis of underlying patterns and diseases, and a few versions of what can be termed "Shang han lun thought." A few clinical examples will be given as illustration.